Myth #1: You don’t need face masks if you are healthy

While face masks are not fool proof against viruses, which can also transmit through the eyes, they are effective at capturing droplets. Some researches have shown that face masks can offer some level of protection.

In a scenario where you are in close contact with an infected person, the mask reduces chances of transmission. A mask is thus vital for health workers and care givers looking after patients. Wearing a mask as an infected person protects others.

Myth #2: Young people should relax as it only kills the elderly

Coronavirus deaths of people as young as 12 years have been reported around the world. In Belgium, a 12-year-old girl succumbed to the condition and in UK, a 13-year-old boy is believed t o be the youngest person to die from the infection in the UK.

And now new analysis by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention has shown that millennials are not invincible to the virus. The new data show that up to one-fifth of infected people ages 20-44 have been hospitalized, including 2%-4% who required treatment in an intensive care unit.

Myth #3: A vaccine will be ready in a few months time

The race to finding a vaccine for Covid-19 is already on with about 35 companies and academic institutions taking part. Four of these institutions are testing the vaccines with animals.

It is noteworthy that the process is quite lengthy with clinical trials being the most critical. A vaccine can thus take up to a decade or more to get regulatory approval.

“Like most vaccinologists, I don’t think this vaccine will be ready before 18 months,” says Annelies Wilder-Smith, professor of emerging infectious diseases at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Photo courtesy

Myth #4: Hot climates kill the virus

This is far from the truth as the new coronavirus can be transmitted in areas with hot and humid climate.

Myth #5: Chinese products can infect you

According to the World Health Organization, the virus cannot last long on packages from China.

Myth #6: Lemon, ginger and herbal medicines can assist in curing and/or preventing Covid-19

There is no evidence to suggest that herbal medicines and homeopathy can treat the virus. While garlic is a healthy food with some antimicrobial properties, there is no evidence that eating it will protect it from the new virus.

Myth #7: Pets and domestic animals can spread the disease

The World Health Organization has stated that dogs cannot contain or transmit this disease as with the cows and birds are also immune to this disease.

Photo courtesy

Myth #8: Antibiotics are effective in preventing and treating Covid-19

Antibiotics only work against bacteria . Covid-19 is a virus, therefore, antibiotics should not be used  to prevent or treat it. However, if you are hospitalized for Covid-19, you may receive antibiotics since bacterial co-infection s possible.