Two months after testing positive for COVID-19, CNN’s Business Editor-at-Large Richard Quest says the cough and fatigue have returned.

Though he has tested negative for COVID-19 and positive for the antibodies, Quest says there are days he feels like he has the virus.

He says that the COVID-19 cough is not your usual flu cough.

“It is a dry, raspy, wheezy, cough. In my case, lots of short, expelling gasps of air, followed by a long, deep, chest-wrenching expiration cough, that has standers-by wondering if I am going to keel over,” Quest revealed on Tuesday.

The CNN journalist says the cough has been there for days and he has been feeling very tired. He experienced similar symptoms when he had COVID-19.

The long tail of COVID-19

His doctor has told him that the virus won’t return, but Quest thinks he is “suffering from the long tail of COVID-19”.

READ ALSO: Going to church and the bar are the easiest ways to get Covid-19 – Texas physicians

Quest has confessed that he has become extremely clumsy as almost everything he holds slips from his hand. He has also been tripping over things.

“If I reach for a glass, or take something out of a cupboard, I will knock it, or drop it on the floor. I have tripped over the curb and gone flying. I fall over furniture. It is as if that part of my brain, which subconsciously adjusts hand and movement to obstacles it sees, isn’t working,” Quest confessed.

The business journalist has also been experiencing some mild confusion and delay of thoughts and words. His digestive system has also been a bit odd.

Quest was diagnosed with COVID-19 in mid-April. His was a mild case and hence he continued hosting his show, Quest means business, from his house.

“My symptoms were on the milder side: I never had breathing difficulties or loss of sense of smell. I was wiped-out tired and I always had “the cough,” which has now returned,” Quest said.

The business journalist has urged those who have not contracted COVID-19 to do their best to avoid the virus. This is because you will feel the COVID-19 effects long after it’s gone.

“It will roar through the body — kill some on the way — injure all in its path — and then when you think “well, thank God that’s gone,” look around, the damage is strewn everywhere and will be with you long after the crisis has passed. COVID is a tornado with a very long tail,” Quest cautioned.